Maxillary Reconstruction with a Fibula Osteoseptocutaneous Free Flap and Simultaneous Insertion of Osseointegrated Dental Implants.
Maxillary Reconstruction with a Fibula Osteoseptocutaneous Free Flap and Simultaneous Insertion of Osseointegrated Dental Implants.
April 1, 2004.
Chang, Yang-Ming D.D.S.; Coskunfirat, O. Koray M.D.; Wei, Fu-Chan M.D.; Tsai, Chi-Ying D.D.S.; Lin, Hsiu-Na
Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery. 113(4):1140-1145
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Abstract:
The fibula osteoseptocutaneous flap is a good option for reconstruction of three-dimensional composite maxillary defects. This flap provides both bone and soft-tissue reconstruction and allows osseointegrated dental implantation, either simultaneously or in a second-stage procedure. Simultaneous placement of osseointegrated dental implants reduces operative sessions and allows faster oral rehabilitation for properly selected patients. The defects may result from trauma or resection of benign tumors or low-grade malignancies. Between August of 1999 and July of 2001, three patients underwent maxillary reconstruction with the fibula osteoseptocutaneous flap and simultaneous osseointegrated dental implants. The cause of the defect was trauma in two cases and resection of an adenoid cystic carcinoma in the other. The mean length of the fibula used for bony reconstruction was 4.7 cm. One osteotomy was performed in one case and no osteotomy was necessary in the other two. Skin islands of 8 x 2.5 cm and 16 x 3.5 cm were used for two patients. For the other patient, a double skin island was used for both nasal (6 x 4 cm) and oral (6 x 5 cm) reconstructions. Two osseointegrated implants were inserted into the fibular bone for each patient. Six months after the first-stage procedure, palatal rotation flaps or mucosa grafts were used to cover the exposed implant necks and prepare the implants for prostheses. One month after the second-stage procedure, prostheses were placed. An implant-supported prosthesis was used for one patient and implant/tissue-supported prostheses were used for the others. At a mean follow-up time of 30 months (range, 16 to 38 months), all patients were able to use the dental prosthesis for chewing (beginning 6 weeks after the final procedure) and all patients were satisfied with the cosmetic results.